20 oz. Sure Strike Shingling Hatchet

In stock

          Unfortunately, it’s not quite sharp enough to shave with unless you get an adequate metal file involved, but this Sure Strike Roofing Hatchet is far from useless.  The 20 oz. solid steel head has a fixed blade (stiffer and more accurate when cutting where unstable, retractable utility knives tend to move) with a replaceable gauge, and a serrated “waffle” hammer opposite the hatchet, which is forged and tempered for strength. Useful for trimming and nailing down shingles (especially shakes, or composition and fiberglass shingles), splintering your own pieces of fat-wood, clearing a path on your hike, or even pitching a tent, this item is like having two tools in one! Estwing straight-blade hatchets are best for use on 235 lb. (no adhesive) or 240 lb. (adhesive), or even lighter weight fiberglass three-tab shingles. With triple wedge construction, a fully polished milled face, and a 13” pale hickory handle that minimizes impact shock with great resilience, balance, and strength, it’s also just nice to look at.  

 

***MINI HISTORY LESSON:

In the March, 1909 edition of Building Age, Vol. 31, the writer explains how to make good use of the gauge...

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          Unfortunately, it’s not quite sharp enough to shave with unless you get an adequate metal file involved, but this Sure Strike Roofing Hatchet is far from useless.  The 20 oz. solid steel head has a fixed blade (stiffer and more accurate when cutting where unstable, retractable utility knives tend to move) with a replaceable gauge, and a serrated “waffle” hammer opposite the hatchet, which is forged and tempered for strength. Useful for trimming and nailing down shingles (especially shakes, or composition and fiberglass shingles), splintering your own pieces of fat-wood, clearing a path on your hike, or even pitching a tent, this item is like having two tools in one! Estwing straight-blade hatchets are best for use on 235 lb. (no adhesive) or 240 lb. (adhesive), or even lighter weight fiberglass three-tab shingles. With triple wedge construction, a fully polished milled face, and a 13” pale hickory handle that minimizes impact shock with great resilience, balance, and strength, it’s also just nice to look at.  

 

***MINI HISTORY LESSON:

In the March, 1909 edition of Building Age, Vol. 31, the writer explains how to make good use of the gauge on a plumb hatchet…

          “The gauge is fastened 4 ½ in. from the face of the hatchet, or a distance equal to that which the shingles are laid to the weather.

          In using the hatchet, we first lay the double course at the eaves to a line in the usual way; then we are through with the line for that side of the roof and chalk is not used at all. Hold the gauge against the bottom of the course just laid and turn the face of the hatchet up toward the ridge of the roof; then lay the next shingle so it will rest on the face of the hatchet and thus continue. In this way, one can lay as many courses in height as he can reach before it is necessary to move further along on the scaffold, and when he meets his partner at the middle of the roof then he is ready to move up the scaffold or toe board for the next courses. With this method one man can get along himself on a roof, as he does not require a partner to help him line up.

          When chalk lines are used it is impossible to keep courses as straight as by the method just described, owing to the fact that the upper line is covered and it is necessary to guess just where it is.” ***