Red Handled Metal Snips (Cuts straight and to the LEFT)

In stock

As you sail through your next project, you might harbor some resentment when needing to cut a hole in a piece of metal. Don’t jump ship, just yet. Red handled tin snips, also known as compound snips, will get you through troubled waters, as they are especially made to easily cut curves toward the port side (left), and make a breach without all the drowning [in tears – unless a razor-sharp metal edge shark-bites your glove-less hand]. The mouth of this tool is effective when cutting soft sheet metals such as tin, aluminum, brass, and thin-gauge (24 gauge or thinner) steel. They are drop-forged, heat treated alloy steel with serrated cutting Jaws to prevent slips. Even when there is no metal to sever, they are perfect for digging into that aggravating clam-shell packaging; if only pearls were involved…

TIP 1: Punch a starter hole for a circular cutout with a straight-blade screwdriver. Pound on the back of the screwdriver with a hammer to puncture the metal and create an opening for the tin snips. 

TIP 2: Waste material will curl up and be removed on the left side of the snips. Designed for final trimming without destroying the integrity of...

$ 0.00

As you sail through your next project, you might harbor some resentment when needing to cut a hole in a piece of metal. Don’t jump ship, just yet. Red handled tin snips, also known as compound snips, will get you through troubled waters, as they are especially made to easily cut curves toward the port side (left), and make a breach without all the drowning [in tears – unless a razor-sharp metal edge shark-bites your glove-less hand]. The mouth of this tool is effective when cutting soft sheet metals such as tin, aluminum, brass, and thin-gauge (24 gauge or thinner) steel. They are drop-forged, heat treated alloy steel with serrated cutting Jaws to prevent slips. Even when there is no metal to sever, they are perfect for digging into that aggravating clam-shell packaging; if only pearls were involved…

TIP 1: Punch a starter hole for a circular cutout with a straight-blade screwdriver. Pound on the back of the screwdriver with a hammer to puncture the metal and create an opening for the tin snips. 

TIP 2: Waste material will curl up and be removed on the left side of the snips. Designed for final trimming without destroying the integrity of the metal, this tool is not made to cut down the center of sheet metal, or effectively cut off more than an inch or two.